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7 Parent/Teacher Conference Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making

7 Parent/Teacher Conference Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making

Sep 26, 2013

By Erin D’Addio For many of you out there, it is time for your first parent/teacher conference of the year.  Some of you have been going to conferences for a while and not getting the results you want.  Here are seven common mistakes that can prevent positive interactions between parents and teachers–that you might not know you’re making–and what to do about it:   Mistake 1.  You enter the conference having preconceived ideas about the teacher, the classroom, and your child’s progress.   How you can fix it:  Come into the conference with an open mind. If you don’t agree with something the teacher is telling you about your child, remember they are working with your child in an environment you never see them in. A teacher can have between 18-25 other students in a room for 5 hours every day. A behavior that is barely noticeable or only a little annoying to you at home can be a much different beast when there are 20 other little munchkins ready to mimic that same behavior. Mistake 2.  Not sharing your home discipline plans or routines with your child’s teacher. How you can fix it: If your child is having a behavior concern, share what works for you at home. Ask the teacher what has been working or not working in the classroom. You never know, a strategy that works for you at home may be the key to your child’s success in the classroom.  The teacher is not going to make a judgement about you or your behavior plan, rather it might open the door to helpful solutions and discussions. Mistake 3.  Telling the teacher your child is bored. How you can fix it:  A teacher will take offense to this immediately. Your child’s teacher could be your biggest ally in your child’s success. You want to nurture the relationship rather than put the teacher at arms length.  Instead, ask if there are websites or resources that you, the parent, could use that would enrich what is being taught in the classroom.  Ask about your child’s engagement level during class, and if the teacher has any tips on how to increase it. Mistake 4. Leaving a...

Stop Letting Facebook Ruin Your Day

Stop Letting Facebook Ruin Your Day

Sep 25, 2013

How many times have you been on Facebook, just to check in with your friends and family, and ended up logging out feeling lonely and depressed?Have you ever checked Facebook feeling relatively good about your day and ended your session feeling like a complete failure?  I sure have. Turns out, I’m not alone. The New Yorker recently posted an article outlining the ups and downs of Facebook.  A review of several studies showed that the “more time people spent browsing the site, as opposed to actively creating content and engaging with it, the more envious they felt.”  This envy stems from a phenomenon called social comparison. There’s a popular meme going around on the web with the Teddy Roosevelt quote, “Comparison is the thief of joy.”  Perhaps it’s popular because we need to keep reminding ourselves.  Other’s accomplishments are not a reflection on our accomplishments.  Our ability to survive our own life, to this day, is an accomplishment.  Each new day is an opportunity for greatness! We also need to keep in mind that the lives we see on Facebook are purposeful representations, illusions even, of the actual people.  We use filters on our photos, post about our vacations, and expound about the most dramatic moments of our lives.  Facebook gives us only a small glimpse of a person’s life, not the whole picture.  It’s not just Facebook either.  Read Josie’s article about how Pinterest causes her to doubt the quality of the care packages she sends to her husband!  I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve looked at Pinterest and thought, “Is this the level of crafts good moms do?”  I’m no where near that.  Most of my domestic endeavors belong on PinFail instead! Yet, another study, by Sebastián Valenzuela and his colleagues, suggests social media “increases social trust and engagement—and even encourages political participation.”  We can even get a rush of excitement when we see large amounts of likes on a picture, high interaction on a status, or a slew of sympathy in times of need.  Pinterest is designed to share ideas, to inspire us, and to suggest ways we can do things with and for the people we love. So how can we participate...

The Tyranny of the Deployment Care Package

The Tyranny of the Deployment Care Package

Sep 24, 2013

In addition to attorney, wife and mom, I am also a nerd. This is best evidenced by the glasses I wore starting in the fifth grade, a fashion accessory that told everyone who saw me all they needed to know about me. As a nerd, I hate not knowing. If I don’t know about something, I research. I gather. I learn. My worst habit is pretending I know something when I don’t, an affliction held by many attorneys borne out of a primal need to not look stupid in front of judges and/or the entire world. Enter the Internet, the best thing to happen to nerds since science. Obviously a double-edged sword, I never have to admit I don’t know something — but I also end up seeing things I can’t unsee. Enter The Deployment Care Package Search on Pinterest. When I asked my husband what I could send him, his response was, “I dunno. Whatever?” I appreciate that he loves me too much to feed into my obsessive need to know the “right” answer. I know he will tell me he loves every bag of trail mix and box of cookies I send, but I’d rather send useful things that won’t wind up in the “Take It Please” box of orphaned care packages. I wanted a list of smart things to put in a care package, a list of things that are durable, won’t melt in South-Central Asian heat, and that Soldiers might, you know, like. Like the good and loyal nerd that I am, I went online. And maybe this is where I went wrong: I started with Pinterest. Oh, Pinterest. I had such high hopes for you. A virtual inspiration board? There’s no way I’d have the time or patience to make the offline version — I’m in! But instead, Pinterest has devolved into the place to put projects for the homemaker I wish I was: mom who dyes rice for a sensory box for her toddlers; mom who crafts a pine cone turkey with her three-year old; mom who makes homemade taco seasoning; mom who takes the time to untangle Toddler Rapunzel’s hair with the fabric softener cocktail. And the...

MOVIE BAD GIRL OF THE WEEK: LAURIE STRODE

MOVIE BAD GIRL OF THE WEEK: LAURIE STRODE

Sep 23, 2013

Embrace your inner bad girl with Movie Bad Girl of the Week. The character of Laurie Strode has appeared in more than one “Halloween” film. This article is focusing on Laurie Strode in “Halloween (H20) Twenty Years Later” On Halloween night 1978 in Haddonfield, Illinois a teenage girl named Laurie Strode was stalked by a madman named Michael Meyers. He killed her friends and most of a hospital staff trying to end her young life. He would have succeeded had it not been for Dr. Sam Loomis (Michael’s psychiatrist) Dr. Loomis saved Laurie’s life twice that fateful night and this horror changed her life forever. You see kids, it turns out that Laurie was adopted by the Strode family after her parents were killed in an automobile accident and Michael Meyers, who is so determined to kill her, is her long lost brother. Laurie faked her own death and went into hiding, convinced deep down that her brother is still alive and is hunting her like an animal. Laurie now lives under the assumed identity Keri Tate. She is the headmistress at a very exclusive private school in California. She is a single mom of a teenage son, (from a failed marriage to a man who is a drug addict) is plagued by nightmares that she controls with medication and is a functioning alcoholic. When we catch up with Laurie it is October 31st and the students and staff of the school are preparing to leave on a camping trip that evening. Her stress levels are high. It is Halloween and she is lost in the fear she has lived with since that night in 1978. Her son wants to go camping with his fellow students and friends and Laurie is dead set against it. She is overly-protective of John not wanting him out of her sight knowing as surely as death, taxes and too many reruns of “The Golden Girls” (on several channels at the same time) that her brother, one day, will come calling. After a couple of heated debates with her son (he tells her that her brother is dead, she is alive and they need to live a typical life without...

Musing #14: I Am a (Tough) Coward, But Am I an Actor?

Musing #14: I Am a (Tough) Coward, But Am I an Actor?

Sep 20, 2013

That is the question. CHICK HAMLETS RULE! Let’s break it down. “How can you be both tough and cowardly?” you ask. Simple. I’m fierce when it comes to that which is unimportant. When it comes to that which really counts in my life, I’m an invertebrate. (But not of the horrific brain-eating variety.) An example of my unimportant ferocity: A trucker once followed me down upper Lexington Avenue, driving at the pace of my gait and catcalling at me from behind the wheel. In broad daylight. I ignored him, until he turned left on East 103rd Street as I crossed it and stopped short, deliberately blocking my path. Enraged, I walloped the hood of his truck with my hardcover-book-laden tote bag, screaming: I’M FUCKING LATE! I DON’T HAVE TIME FOR THIS SHIT!!! He drove away in both shock and a dented truck. (Yes, I know that was a crime.) Seriously, do not fuck with me. Never mistake me for vulnerable just because I’m small. There was a schmuck who grabbed me around the waist from behind on the street in Bed-Stuy in 2001 (also in broad daylight). He got the wind knocked out of him by a hard Stacy elbow to the gut. An example of my spinelessness: I am scared shitless of my own screenplay. (Yes, I wrote one.) “Why do you insist upon the term ACTOR in lieu of ACTRESS?” you ask. Also simple. The term “actress” is just as degrading as the term “Jewess.” If I had an M.D. (like an old-school LeVine), I wouldn’t be a “doctress.” If I were an attorney instead of a legal secretary, I wouldn’t be a “lawyeress.” If I taught at a university, I wouldn’t be a “professoress.” Hillary Clinton was not the junior “senatress” from New York. The original “Juliet” was a dude. Cate Blanchett played Bob Dylan. The work is the work. It does not give a shit about your chromosomes. Thus, neither should the language. Need I go on? I needn’t. Tune in for next Friday’s commentary on the pros and cons of life sans cars, Musing #15: Walk Quickly, and Carry a Big Purse (or CARS, Part I). Until then, “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!” Stacy @IvyLawEditor Share this:RedditPinterestFacebookLinkedInTumblrTwitterGoogleEmailLike this:Like...

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